Wednesday, April 27, 2016

Thunderstorm Art Project with Mr. Brown for Preschool and K. Thunderstorm Safety for Kids.

Thunderstorm Safety Art for Kids

Yesterday we had great opportunities to observe thunderstorms and hail from the safety of the house. Today was for fun activities to reflect on the experience and to review new safety rules we have learned.

We built our thunderstorm art project around the gradual changes in nature we observed. Mr. Brown helped us with the sounds of the thunderstorm which made this art project exciting! But safety is first, and we had quite an experience with that yesterday!


Mr. Brown Can Moo!

"Mr. Brown Can Moo! Can You? Dr. Seuss's Book of Wonderful Noises" is an excellent book to add to this activity. We read through the first pages and stopped at the sounds of rain, thunder, and lightning. This is the best visual for the sounds!

We also used this opportunity for a quick practice of the digraph -oo- words.

Amazon affiliate link: Mr. Brown Can Moo, Can You : Dr. Seuss's Book of Wonderful Noises (Bright and Early Board Books)


For this activity we used:
  • Dr. Seuss book,
  • cotton balls and white glue,
  • watercolors, a brush, and a dropper,
  • washi tape and self-adhesive gems,
  • green construction paper,
  • Kwik Stix red paint.


Thunderstorm Art Project

The first change in nature we observed is the cloudy sky. That's where we started with our art project. We used green construction paper to represent beautiful and peaceful green grass before the rain. My Firefly used a pencil to outline a cloud, then traced it with the school glue (pictured above).



We had observed the change in colors of the clouds. She loved painting the cotton balls grey with a brush and with drops of paint from the dropper. I reminded her to use the dropper carefully to avoid putting too much water down. Though it wasn't messy. She could only pick up a couple of drops of paint at a time from her watercolor case.


"Dibble dibble dibble dopp," said Mr. Brown. My Firefly's pretty rain drops are made with the pieces of washi tape. She loved working with washi tape while making Dr. Seuss's noises.

"Splatt splatt splatt" was easily drawn with red Kwik Stix solid tempera paint. The vibrant red color is dry in seconds - very handy for making quick lightning strikes. Amazon affiliate link: The Pencil Grip Kwik Stix Solid Tempera Paint, Super Quick Drying, 12 Pack (TPG-602)

My Firefly wanted to add self-adhesive gems to her lightning. Now, this lightning looks dangerous!

"Boom boom" Mr. Brown's thunder represented by black and silver washi tape  made the thunderstorm even more dangerous.


Thunderstorm Safety

Since it is only the basics for us, we discussed that lightning is electricity produced by the storm. The lightning strike is very dangerous. That's why it's so important to stay indoors during the storm.

Water is a great conductor of electricity. This knowledge would be too advanced for this age. But the simple fact is it is a bad idea to go jumping in puddles barefoot when there is thunder and lightning around.

Unfortunately, that's what we observed yesterday. A father followed his two kids age 4 and under jumping in puddles barefoot while thunder was heard and lightning was visible. When I actually told that father that the rule is to take kids inside, he replied: "Whose rule?"

This encounter is one of the reasons we are working on thunderstorm rules for two days now... and discussing what to do if we can see somebody else is in danger. This article might be helpful too: Two Questions That Lower Anxiety from Mama Smiles.

The Thunderstorm Art project was so fun!


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