Saturday, July 11, 2015

Letter H is for Honey Bubbles. Bubble Making Experiments for Preschoolers

Honey Bubble Math: An Easy 3-Ingridient Recipe a 3 Year Old Can Follow

Letter H is for honey bubbles. Kids had so much fun learning with our letter of the week! All they had to do is count to 4, sample some honey, mix - and blow. After they tested their own bubble solutions outside, they came back to enjoy some bubble art. This post is a part of our "Creative ABCs" series found here: Creative ABCs.

 

Bubble Trouble


"Bubble Trouble" by Tom Percival is our favorite book about friends... and bubble making machines. Two best friends are getting into the bubble making contest. It was friendly at first, but then got completely out of hand! They created a huge bang. Then they realized that friends were to play and work together, and so they did. But will this last? 

Invitation to Make Honey Bubbles for Preschoolers

For this activity we used:
  • a toy cup for measuring and a big cup for mixing the solution,
  • a tray for containing spilled water during the water transfer activity,
  • chenille stems (pipe cleaners) for making bubble wands,
  • a table spoon for measuring (and sampling) honey and stirring.

Ingredients:
  • 4 cups water,
  • 1 cup dish soap: Dawn Original,
  • 1-2 tablespoons honey.

 

Letter H is for Honey Bubbles

Here is our step-by-step for this activity
  1. A minute to explore the content of the tray and to explain the activity.
  2. Water transfer and counting: pour water from the bottle to the toy cup, empty the cup into the big cup (bowl), count 4 cups total. Depending on a child's experience, there was a lot of spilling. It helped to do the transfer in the tray. The tray was emptied into the sink as needed. If there was a mistake in measuring water, we emptied the cups and started again.
  3. Measuring and adding 1 cup of soap. 
  4. Honey: assist with filling the tablespoon with honey, offer to sample honey if they want it, add more honey to the spoon as needed, and offer to drink some water if they want to.
  5. Stirring: the drops of honey in soap looked fascinating to kids. Observe the honey dissolving in soap. Stir until no honey is visible.



Note - honey bubbles!

Honey bubbles can attract bees. Honey can be a cause for allergies for little kids.

Toy cups can be different sizes. The bigger plastic toy cup we used called for 2 tablespoons of honey. At another time we used a smaller metal toy cup. In that case, only 1 tablespoon of honey was added to the solution.


Bubble Making Experiments Are So Much Sensory Fun!

Bubbles are little kids' favorites for many wonderful reasons! Watching the motions of floating through the air or popping are all exciting. Kids absolutely loved this simple introduction to chemistry. Also, the pretty and changing colors, the joy of playing together, and the miracle solution that transfers into something different again and again. My Firefly used the full amount of her solution every time she played.

The DIY wands are made quickly and the best for this solution. We tested different shapes. It turned out that the biggest oval or diamond shaped wands were the only ones that worked for us.

Kids discovered that bubbles can be formed by the slow wide motion of the hand holding a wand, by holding the wand against the wind, or by blowing.


We observed and discussed the colors of the honey bubbles to prepare for the Bubble Art Project.

Visit our "Creative ABCs" series for more letter of the week fun and learning: Creative ABCs.

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